1. New McKinsey & Co research papers:

In the EDvance program we utilise the findings from previous McKinsey papers on The World’s Best Performing Schools (2007) and The Most Improved Ones (2010) – which examined what great school systems look like and how they can sustain significant improvements from any starting point.

There are two new McKinsey papers we think have something noteworthy to say as they switch focus from school systems to what drives student performance. They are also preparing to release further papers, that are region specific across the world.

These reports examine five specific factors they found to be particularly important to student outcomes: mindsets, teaching practices, information technology, hours of instruction and early childhood education.

Here are the three key global findings about what drives student performance:

1. Having the right mindset matters much more than socio-economic background

2. Students who receive a blend of inquiry-based and teacher-directed instruction have the best outcomes

3. While technology can support student learning outside of school, its record inside school is mixed. The best results come when the technology is placed in the hands of the teachers

To dig in and read more about each of these findings click on the article links below:

 

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2. How can we support aspirant student behaviour?

Many EDvance schools invest in Positive Behaviour Support (PBS), which is a great way to implement a program to teach students explicitly about behaviour and to establish and maintain a calm and orderly learning environment. But once schools have more cooperative student behaviours, what could we then aspire towards?

There is a clear opportunity to consider how the PBS process could be extended to include explicit teaching of student mindsets, which support great learning outcomes.

We wanted to share some of the latest developments in the area of further supporting positive student behaviour which been seen to have positive results on student outcomes (also noted in the major findings from McKinsey & Co papers on Drivers of Student Performance) as well as some practical resources for schools to be able to put some of these latest ideas into action!

A cross-university collaboration who work on:

– practical interventions that can be delivered at scale (i.e. reaching millions of students),
– focussing on raising academic achievement by changing the way students think about school using free short (45 min) once-off online modules to change student mindsets

As a result of the PERTS collaboration, Stanford University are leading the way in how to teach growth mindset interventions in an easy to scale, low cost way.

Online ‘mindset’ interventions help students do better in school, Stanford research shows

Stanford researchers found that brief Internet-based interventions that instill a “growth mindset” and a sense of purpose can improve learning, especially for struggling students. These interventions could potentially reach vast numbers of students at low cost.

Teaching growth mindset

Carol Dweck’s team at Stanford University have been working on just that – they found that brief Internet-based interventions that instill a “growth mindset” and a sense of purpose can improve learning, especially for struggling students. These interventions could potentially reach vast numbers of students at low cost.

The mindset kit is a free set of online lessons and practices designed to help you teach and foster adaptive beliefs about learning.

Go to https://www.mindsetkit.org

Imagine in the WA context if we were able to do something more systematic in teaching growth mindset through a PBS process of explicit teaching? We are running a workshop in 2018, so come and work with us as we explore how we can better support students in developing a mindset to enhance learning.

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